REFLECTION CAPSULES – May 01, 2022: Sunday

(Based on Acts 5:27-32, 40-41, Rev 5:11-14 and Jn 21:1-19 – 3rd Sunday of Easter, Cycle C)

An American reporter once visited the office of the great Nobel-prize-winning physicist, Niels Bohr, in Copenhagen.

(Niels Bohr is famous for his contribution in the field of quantum physics especially by his understanding of the atomic structure)

The reporter was amazed to find that over Bohr’s desk was a “horseshoe”.

(A horseshoe, by superstition, was considered to be bringing good luck and good fortune.

Horseshoe charms and amulets have been used, down through centuries and civilizations, to ward off the evil and bring in good fate!)

This horseshoe was securely nailed to the wall, with the open end up, in the approved manner (so it would catch the good luck and not let it spill out!)

The reporter said with a nervous laugh, “Surely you don’t believe the horseshoe will bring you good luck, do you, Professor Bohr? After all, you are a scientist!

The genius scientist, Bohr, chuckled and said,
“I believe no such thing, my good friend.
No… not at all!
I am scarcely likely to believe in such foolish nonsense.

However, I am told that a horseshoe will bring you good luck, whether you believe in it or not!”

The scientist, with his reasonable mind, did not have faith in the horseshoe bringing in any luck…

However, at the back of his mind, he still continued to possess the horseshoe, wanting to have any favours or luck, if it all it brought any!

The mind, with its reasons, said no, to an act which required faith…

The heart, however, still chose to seek and enjoy any benefits that it could bring!

Our faith in the Resurrection of the Lord, is perhaps similar….

Our minds sometimes, do not really have faith or trust in this mysterious miracle of the Resurrection..

Yet, we continue to hold on this mystery, expecting favours and benefits!

Isn’t it so?

Like the scientist, we refuse to be active acknowledgers of the object of faith and yet want to enjoy the benefits of the same…

We fail the live the life and fruits of the Resurrection…
… and yet, we wish to have spiritual gains…

We fail to actively profess and live our faith…
… and yet, we wish to enjoy many providential graces..

Is our Faith in the Resurrection of mere theoretical and pragmatic value or have we embraced it as our life-giving and life-motivating truth?

Is our Belief in the Resurrection, only a springboard to grab many blessings and favours or has it become the foundation stone for a passionate and vibrant faith?

The Gospel of the Day presents the Risen Lord encountering His Disciples and strengthening their belief and faith in His Resurrection.

The Disciples after the death of their Master, had been a frightened lot.

They were even unable to believe some of the appearance stories of Jesus, to people who were associated with them.

But the Lord today appears to them, and casts away their fears and apprehensions.

He invites His disciples to have breakfast with Him (Jn 21:10, 12)

Jesus invites the disciples to throw away their doubts, and instead to believe that He is truly Risen, in human flesh and blood

He invites the disciples to open their eyes, and dispel the shadows of suspicions, and instead be convinced of His Resurrection

This experience of the Risen Lord would find its empowerment, for the Disciples, on the Pentecost Day, when the Holy Spirit would fill them with power and strength.

It is this exhibition of power and force that we see in St Peter, when he boldly proclaimed Jesus as the Lord and Saviour (Acts 3: 13-15, 17-19)

The Risen Lord, became for the Apostles, the source, strength and summit for their expression of faith and trust.

Today, we are invited to have this similar faith – bold, passionate and zealous- in the Risen Lord.

However, sometimes, the Resurrection of the Lord remains only a mere “theoretical” dogma and fails to get converted to a “practical” and experiential reality in our life.

Our lives are still lived in “fear”…. Our activities are still conducted with “apprehension”
We live our lives without much “joy”… We spend our days without much “hope”

Our minds sometimes, do not really have faith or trust in this mysterious miracle of the Resurrection…

Yet, we continue to hold on this mystery, expecting favours and benefits!

The Risen Lord today invites us… to believe in Him more deeply and witness His life more radically in our lives.

He offers His Holy Eucharist as His Risen and Living Presence in our midst.
He gives His Holy Word as His Dynamic and Transforming Reality in our lives.

Let us grow more and more, in our conviction and love for Jesus, the Life and the Resurrection.

With St Peter, let us also proclaim and profess: “Lord, You know everything! You know that I love You!” (Jn 21: 17b)

May our faith in Him, not be a “pragmatic” approach, just to receive favours and benefits… rather, may it grow, transform and bring renovations in our life!

God Bless! Live Jesus!


Discovering the beauty of the Catholic Church through the Catechism
JEWISH LITURGY AND CHRISTIAN LITURGY.

A better knowledge of the Jewish people’s faith and religious life as professed and lived even now can help our better understanding of certain aspects of Christian liturgy.
For both Jews and Christians Sacred Scripture is an essential part of their respective liturgies: in the proclamation of the Word of God, the response to this word, prayer of praise and intercession for the living and the dead, invocation of God’s mercy.
In its characteristic structure the Liturgy of the Word originates in Jewish prayer.
the Liturgy of the Hours and other liturgical texts and formularies, as well as those of our most venerable prayers, including the Lord’s Prayer, have parallels in Jewish prayer.
The Eucharistic Prayers also draw their inspiration from the Jewish tradition.
The relationship between Jewish liturgy and Christian liturgy, but also their differences in content, are particularly evident in the great feasts of the liturgical year, such as Passover.
Christians and Jews both celebrate the Passover.

For Jews, it is the Passover of history, tending toward the future; for Christians, it is the Passover fulfilled in the death and Resurrection of Christ, though always in expectation of its definitive consummation (CCC #1096)

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